The Rayglass boat building process explained: Part two - Rayglass Boats

The Rayglass boat building process explained: Part two

Once a Rayglass boat’s hull has been formed and has gained its signature lustrous shine, it’s sent from our lamination facility to our Mt Wellington workshop to be finished.

At Rayglass we have a team of 15 boatbuilders at our Mt Wellington headquarters where our award-winning Legend and Protector range is built, alongside a further 5 at our new 3500 manufacturing facility just down the road. Find out what our builders do during this final stage to produce the boats that Rayglass is famous for.

The cabin, plumbing and wiring start to take shape

Once the boat arrives as a fibreglass shell, the builder’s first job is to cover the gelcoat in a protective film to prevent any damage through the rest of the build process. This ensures the boat maintains the attractive high gloss finish Rayglass Boats is known for.

Firstly, the power tools come out and holes are cut in the shell for wiring and plumbing so that we can fit electronics, gauges wiring looms, plumbing for toilets, bilge pumps, freshwater systems and more. From here, we can install the water tank and fuel tanks.

Next, A hood-liner of flexible carpet is then fitted over the fibreglass in the cabin to beautify the surfaces and cover any exposed fibreglass before the hardtop, rocket launcher and grab rails are installed. Once the hardtop is in place, spotlights, radars and other electronics are fitted.

On the Legend 2500 and 2800, we now fit the gas lines for the cooker, the boat is given a certification compliant to AS/NZS 5601 (which gives you peace of mind that the gas system is completely safe and functional). After that, the cabins really start to take shape as the galley area comes together as we install a fridge, 2-hob gas cooker, freshwater tap, and teak cabinetry.

The engine and anchor gear are installed

Once the cabin fitout, wiring and plumbing is complete the engine riggers start their work fitting out the engine compartment. On stern drive models, the engine bay is soundproofed then the engine and stern legs are installed and rigged into the boat. For outboard models, the engine is mounted onto the transom then rigged into the boat.

Finally, the engine riggers install all the gauges and electronics into the dash as well as through hull transducers on the keel.

At this stage, the builder will fit the bow area with the anchor and warp, electric anchor winches, bow rails and cleats. They’ll then fit out the transom with grab rails, boarding ladders, bilge pump, plumbing and saltwater wash down pump. After all these parts are installed, the windscreen is fitted and the boat is almost done.

Upholstery, final touches and sea-trialling

Once the builder is happy with all their installations, they’ll fit the upholstery and the flooring to the underfloor storage. At this stage the boat is seaworthy, comfortable and fully functional – but we’re not finished yet!

Our boat builder now casts his eagle eye over the boat – running through extensive checklists for the engine run-up, freshwater systems, and electronics. When we’re sure that everything’s working as it should be, we get to have a little fun.

The team takes finished boats out on the water for extensive sea trialling and engine testing to make sure all systems are fully operational before the boat is delivered. If we’re satisfied it’s the best boat it can be, graphics packages are fitted and the vessel’s fine details are checked by the same builder that’s been working on it from the beginning, followed up by a quality control checklist completed by the Fit-out Supervisor.

Our favourite part

We’re truly passionate about the boats we build and our staff love working on them from day one. This makes coming to work a pleasure.

Despite that, the best part of any build is always the last – when we finally deliver a finished boat to her new owners.



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